BLACKOUT: A New Film From Larry Fessenden Includes Photography – ScreenAnarchy | Episode Movies

BLACKOUT: A new film from Larry Fessenden Wraps Photography

It’s always a pleasure to discuss a new film from Larry Fessenden, one of the true bastions of independent genre filmmaking out there. Fessenden just wrapped up filming on his new movie, a werewolf movie called Blackout, this month and is now heading to the post office.

A painter is convinced he is a werewolf wreaking havoc in a small American town under a full moon.

Staying true to his roots, Fessenden filmed in New York’s Hudson Valley and hired Brooklyn-based artist John Mitchell to create the paintings for the film’s main character’s artwork.

“My approach was to combine a naturalistic documentary style with the mythological tropes of the werewolf story, an abiding interest in marrying realism with stylization, and fusing themes of contemporary society with classic monster movie clichés.”

His cast is pretty great too: Addison Timlin (Little sister, Like me, spoiled), Motell Gyn Foster (history of marriage, foxhole), Joseph Castillo-Midyett (equalizer, Death saved my life), Ella Rae Peck (coming soon crumb catcher), Rigo Garay (coming soon crumb catcher), John Speredakos (Wendigo, I sell the dead), Michael Buscemi (habit, BlackKkKlansman), Jeremy Holm (the ranger, Brooklyn 45), Joe Schwanberg (You are the next one, Off-season), Barbara Crampton (You are the next one, Jacob’s wife), James Le Gros (foxhole, The Last Winter) and Marshall Bell (Total recall, Stand by Me).

I mean, is anyone, a who’s who of Glass Eye Pix alumni coming back for another Fessenden film? The full press release follows.

Independent production company Glass Eye Pix is ​​pleased to announce that director Larry Fessenden has wrapped up his seventh feature film. blackout. The image which stars Alex Hurt as Charley Barrett, a painter convinced he is a werewolf wreaking havoc on a small American town under a full moon, shrouded in the glow of the October 8th Hunter Moon , with collection completed on October 16th.

The film features an Altman-esque cast of co-stars – some newcomers and many longtime members of the Glass Eye Pix stable – including Addison Timlin (Little sister, Like me, spoiled), Motell Gyn Foster (history of marriage, foxhole), Joseph Castillo-Midyett (equalizer, Death saved my life), Ella Rae Peck (coming soon crumb catcher), Rigo Garay (coming soon crumb catcher), John Speredakos (Wendigo, I sell the dead), Michael Buscemi (habitBlacKkKlansman), Jeremy Holm (The Ranger, Brooklyn 45), Joe Swanberg (You’re Next, Off-season), Barbara Crampton (You are the next one, Jacob’s wife), James Le Gros (foxhole, The Last Winter) and Marshall Bell (Total recall, Stand by Me). Casting was done by Lois Drabkin, who had previously worked with Fessenden Under and the ranger.

The film was produced by Fessenden, James Felix McKenney and Chris Ingvordsen and co-produced by Gaby Leyner. Collin Braizie was a cinematographer, having previously helped produce Glass Eye Pix foxhole. Paintings for the main character’s artwork were created for the film by Brooklyn-based artist John Mitchell.

blackout was filmed in local businesses and locations in New York’s Hudson Valley and serves as a portrait of the area including Woodstock, Olivebridge, Andes and Kingston. Many local merchants generously supported independent production. Fessenden explains, “My approach was to combine a naturalistic documentary style with the mythological tropes of the werewolf story, an abiding interest in marrying realism with stylization, and fusing themes of contemporary society with classic clichés of monster movies.”

Makeup and special effects were done by longtime Glass Eye Pix collaborators Brian Spears and Peter Gerner, who previously created the Frankenstein monster for Fessenden’s 2019 film spoiled. Fessenden comments, “Yes, I’m competing with Marvel and Blumhouse to create my own Monsterverse, but at a very different price.” Fessenden’s 1997 film habit is a vampire film notable for its gritty ’90s New York atmosphere and naturalistic treatment of the genre.

Fessenden goes straight into post-production, with his typical impatience to get the work done on time.

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